Three roll mill processing nano material - we were cited in many papers!

Our lab model three roll mill is the perfect choice for the processing of nano materials. Particles are thoroughly and uniformly dispersed. Here we have a selected few of papers to make our point.

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Superior electromagnetic interference shielding and dielectric properties of carbon nanotube composites through the use of high aspect ratio CNTs and three-roll milling

by Paul Theilmann, Dong-Jin Yun, Peter Asbeck, and Sung-Hoon Park

Summary:

Scientists from both the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of California and the Advanced Material Research Center at the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology have discovered that three roll milling yields advanced electromagnetic interference shielding for carbon nanotube (CNT) composites. These researchers used a Torrey Hills three roll mill to guarantee successful assimilation and distribution of intertwined multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) in their polymer matrix. A stable and even dispersal is essential in achieving maximum efficiency in electromagnetic shielding for CNT/polymer composites.

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Automated dispersion and orientation analysis for carbon nanotube reinforced polymer composites

by Yi Gao, Zhuo Li, Ziyin Lin, Liangjia Zhu, Allen Tannenbaum, Sylvain Bouix and C P Wong

Summary:

Carbon nanotube (CNT) and polymer composites are very important to multiple industries, including aerospace, energy, electronics and many more, due to their strong durability as well as superior electrical and thermal conductivity. A Torrey Hills three roll mill was used to disperse dry CNTs into a silicone resin, so that researchers could compile orientation and dispersion indices with an image analysis technique. These indices will allow the properties of CNT/polymer composites to be more easily predicted, so that their microstructure can be optimized.

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 Room temperature ionic liquids for epoxy nanocomposite synthesis: Direct dispersion and cure

by James A. Throckmorton, Arianna L. Watters, Xing Geng, and Giuseppe R. Palmese

Summary:

In a study aiming to compare nanocomposites made with volatile solvents to silica nanocomposites made with a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) preparation strategy, researchers in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Drexel University adjusted a Torrey Hills 2.5 x 5 three roll mill lab model to the precise specifications needed (a gap of 20 microns between the 2.5’’ diameter rollers, and a surface speed of 31, 84 and 174 RPM, in this case). The RTIL nanocomposite preparation proved to be an effective alternative, which may help improve the structural strength and electrical conductivity of thermosetting polymers, such as epoxies.

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RTM processing and electrical performance of carbon nanotube modified epoxy/fibre composites

by Elisabete F. Reia da Costa, Alexandros A. Skordos, Ivana K. Partridge, and Amir Rezai

Summary:

Researchers used a Torrey Hills three roll mill to disperse surface modified and unmodified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into an RTM-grade (resin transfer molding) epoxy resin. They discovered that dispersing C100 nanotubes by three roll milling led to increased electrical conductivity in the final composite structure. This exciting research will help improve aerospace grade composites so that they have superior electrical capabilities.

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Flow of carbon nanoparticle loaded epoxy resin in liquid moulding

by Elisabete F. Reia da Costa, Alexandros A. Skordos, Ivana K. Partridge, and Amir Rezai

Summary:

Aiming to investigate how to best transfer the valuable properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to polymer nanocomposites, researchers from the Composites Centre at Cranfield University milled dry C100 nanotubes and surface activated nanotubes into a resin with a Torrey Hills three roll mill, so that Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) could be performed afterwards. Studying the RTM of glass and carbon epoxy composites that contain dispersed carbon nanoparticles has helped scientists understand that CNTs must be consistently dispersed into a homogeneous polymer in order to best yield high electrical conductivity and advanced thermal properties.